DocoClub: Life in a Day & How Do We Get to Space?

When:
24/02/2016 @ 6:00 pm – 9:30 pm
2016-02-24T18:00:00+00:00
2016-02-24T21:30:00+00:00
Cost:
Free; RSVP using the Buy Tickets link

DocoClubLifeInaDaySecond installment of our new event series DocoClub, curated by documentary maker Cavell Schipp. DocoClub will be showcasing documentaries by established and upcoming film-makers in the hopes of sharing our enthusiasm for the art of documentary making, as well as to create a space for individuals to share their own work.

On this evening we will  be showcasing 2 films – Life in a Day – and – How Do We Get to Space? We will also be in conversation live online with the film makers of How Do We Get to Space?

About the Films

* LIFE IN A DAY is a historic film capturing for future generations what it was like to be alive on the 24th of July, 2010. On that day, thousands of people around the world recorded videos of their lives to take part in Life in a Day, a cinematic experiment to document a single day on earth. From more than 4,500 hours of footage recorded and uploaded to YouTube, Oscar-winning director Kevin Macdonald and executive producer Ridley Scott created a 90-minute feature film that offers an entertaining, surprising and moving view of life on earth. 

* Out of the Pilbara desert in Western Australia, an unlikely group of 11-year olds create the world’s first Aboriginal interactive comic book, NEOMAD. HOW DO WE GET TO SPACE? captures the arguments, pranks, computer wizardry, and the grand fantastical vision as the young artists battle to create themselves as the heroes of their own epic sci-fi adventure – Meet the real Love Punks and Satellite Sisters from Roebourne!

How Do We Get To Space? is a short documentary that has emerged out of the Yijala Yala Project. Director and editor Chynna Campbell has been living in Roebourne and working with the community on the Yijala Yala Project since 2011. Chynna has created many short films for the project but How Do We Get To Space? is her first half-hour documentary. The film was awarded best documentary (short form) at the 2014 ATOM Awards.

Above text adapted from the official film description