Okey Ndibe in Conversation

When:
01/11/2014 @ 4:00 pm – 6:30 pm
2014-11-01T16:00:00+00:00
2014-11-01T18:30:00+00:00
Cost:
£ 5 (cost of ticket reduced from book price)

ndibe2-940x429

We are delighted to host the acclaimed author Okey Ndibe in Conversation at Book and Kitchen.

“We clearly have a fresh talent at work here. It is quite a while since I sensed creative promise on this level.” —Wole Soyinka, winner of the Nobel Prize in Literature

As part of the African Reading Group London (ARG! London) author events, Okey Ndibe will be reading from his new book, Foreign Gods, Inc. followed by a Q&A.

Okey Ndibe is an acclaimed novelist, poet and essayist. His first novel, Arrow of Rain, was published to high critical acclaim in 2000. He is founding editor of the award-winning, African Commentary magazine. He has also served on the editorial board of Hartford Courant where his essays won national and state awards. 

Currently, Okey lives and works in the United States. He teaches African and African Diaspora Literature at Brown University. 

Praise for Foreign Gods, Inc.

“Razor-sharp” The New York Times Book Review

“Unforgettable … Ndibe seems to have a boundless ear for the lyrical turns of phrase of the working people of rural Nigeria… a page-turning allegory about the globalized world.” —Los Angeles Times

“Dazzling… Okey Ndibe is bound to set himself apart from the pack. Who doesn’t want to read a novel about a good god heist?” —The Guardian

“Okey Ndibe’s Foreign Gods, Inc is one of the most impressive African novels that I have read in years.  Comic, sad—even tragic—Ndibe is a master craftsman, weaving his narrative with ethnic materials (and surprises) and a profundity that will startle you by the end of the story…” CounterPunch

“With Moliere-like humorous debunking of religious hypocrisy and rancid materialism, it teems with characters and situations that make you laugh in order not to cry.” —Ngugi wa Thiong’o, author of Wizard of the Crow

Foreign Gods, Inc. is a blistering exploration of the contemporary African immigrant experience in America.” —Chika Unigwe, author of On Black Sisters Street

“A challenging romp of gods and styles.”—John Edgar Wideman, author of Philadelphia Fire

“The best-laid plans often go awry. But they can certainly make for an entertaining read.” —The New York Post 

“Ndibe writes of cultural clash in a moving way that makes Ike’s march toward disaster inexorable and ineffably sad.” Kirkus, STARRED Review